Sunday, August 14, 2011

Magpie 78


Speaking of painting, and painters, I’ve always been fascinated by the life of Paul Gauguin.
An interesting story.

Picture a stockbroker, actually rather successful, who for years lived a conventional, fairly stuffy middle-class life. In his spare time he became a self-taught amateur artist – and he painted conventional pictures.
It was in the 1880s that he decided to pack it all in so that he could paint full time.

I’ve been to Arles in the south of France, where Gauguin spent nine weeks painting with his friend Vincent van Gogh, and I’ve visited the island of Martinique, where he hoped to find an idyllic landscape. Above, his self-portrait.

But it was in 1891 that he decided to sail to French Polynesia to escape European civilization and "everything that is artificial and conventional".

His rejection of European urban values led him to Tahiti, where he found – some say he created -- an unspoiled culture, exotic and sensual.

Gauguin's greatest innovation was his use of color, which he used not for its ability to mimic nature but for its emotional impact.

The first artist to systematically use the effects of the art movement known as Primitivism and achieve broad public success was Paul Gauguin.

20 comments:

Henry Clemmons said...

Very interesting and I enjoyed the paintings too.

WINDOWLAD said...

..i like those artworks, especially the 3rd & 4th one.. thanks for sharing 'em!(:

~Kelvin

Jinksy said...

I've always loved his sense of colour and composition - a must for any graphic artist...

Helen said...

Interesting and entertaining!

Berowne said...

Great to hear from Henry C., Windowlad, Jinksy and Helen -- thanks.

JJ Roa Rodriguez said...

This is very informative/educational for someone like me who only watch and say wow to paintings...

Nice post sir!

JJRod'z

Kristen Haskell said...

I love reading your posts. I always learn something. I am doing a bit of painting myself these days and I am fascinated with the layers it takes to achieve the desired color. I love that he used colors to provoke emotion rather than copy what we see in nature. Now I know why the sand on my recent seascape is not the color of sand and I just can't bring myself to change it.

signed...bkm said...

Beautiful write up Berowne - painting most lovely with a bit of art history...a perfect picture...bkm

Berowne said...

My thanks to Kristen H. Keep that sand the color YOU like. :-)

izzy said...

He really is fabulous, one of my favorite painters; his people are so sturdy and natural, yet fluid. And the colors! thanks.

jen revved said...

You give us a beautiful, effort-filled full meal here-- wonderful! xxxj

Ren said...

What a wonderful post.
Thank you.

Tumblewords: said...

Vivid colors enhanced by your words. Nice post!

Berowne said...

It's why we do it, isn't it? I mean responses like the above from izzy, jen revved, Ren and Tumblewords -- thanks.

kaykuala said...

Gauguin is unique. Colors are loud, location in the South Seas and subject matter are human figures. No comparison to others. Such a pleasure to see! Thank you for sharing.

Everyday Goddess said...

His work is beautiful. Gaugin Pink is dreamy!

Doctor FTSE said...

Another informative post. Thank you. One of Somerset Maugham's novels tells the story of Gaugin - "The Moon and Sixpence", I think.

HyperCRYPTICal said...

Lovely story and very imformative - thank you.

Anna :o]

Trellissimo said...

I echo HyperCRYPTICAL. And Doc FTSE is correct. That novel is about a Gaugin LookAlike.

Berowne said...

My sincere thanks to kaykuala, E Goddess, Doc FTSE, hyperCRYPTICal and Trellissimo for your encouraging responses to my post.

 
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