Monday, March 7, 2011

[For ABC Wednesday, Magpie 56, Writer's Island and Sunday Scribblings]
“H” is for “Head Over Heels”
Think of a beautiful woman, perhaps the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen.
She falls in love with a guy who has the head, a big head, of a farm animal.
And she falls head over heels.
That’s the story of Queen Titania and Bottom the Weaver.
You remember him – he’s the chap in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” who has his head turned into that of a jassack. :-)

Nick Bottom – who knew he had a first name? – is a simple workman, with the emphasis on “simple.”
He and his fellow working stiffs are planning to put on a play for the Duke’s wedding day; if the presentation is successful each performer will be in line to receive sixpence a day for the rest of their lives. (Which would be pretty much like winning the national lottery as far as they’re concerned, so they’re all taking this production of theirs very seriously.)
But Puck, a crafty, not to mention cunning, little character with magical powers, a prankster par excellence, decides to have a little fun with them.
He does the deed with Bottom’s head and leaves him in the forest.

Along comes the spectacularly beautiful Titania, Queen of the Fairies. She is what Shakespeare would have described as a “looker,” if he had thought of it. :-) Check out those gossamer wings.
She has herself been enchanted by a love potion made from the juice of a rare flower – and you know how powerful that stuff can be – administered by her jealous husband, who has rigged things up so that she will fall for the first individual she sees after waking up.
He says: “Wake when some vile thing is near.”
The vile thing turns out to be our friend Bottom.

The Queen falls head over, to risk repeating myself, heels for this guy; they make a handsome couple. :-)
Titania orders her minions to treat him well:
"Be kind and courteous to this gentleman.
Feed him with apricocks and dewberries,
With purple grapes, green figs and mulberries;
Nod to him, elves, and do him courtesies."
And it's a tribute to Bottom that he can adapt to any situation; he takes all of this in stride -- he’s enjoying every minute.
Later, when he’s back to his true self, he tries to describe that adventure. He figures it must have been a dream:
“I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say! The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, what my dream was!”
But now of course he’s aware they must all rehearse the play to be ready for the Duke’s wedding day.

(I knew, with a bit of luck, I’d be able to work this week’s Magpie prompt in here somewhere. :-))
Bottom: “Most important, fellow actors, eat no garlic, for we are to utter sweet breath, and I don’t doubt everyone will say, it is a sweet comedy!”

41 comments:

Lolamouse said...

I love Midsummer Night's Dream! We named one of our dogs Puck because he's such a little rascal!

thingy said...

Very nice. I can't believe Will never said that word.

Shari Sunday said...

Bravo!!!

ds said...

A sweet comedy, indeed! "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is one of my favorites: "Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,/Such shaping fantasies that apprehend/More than cool reason ever comprehends." Brilliant working in of the garlic; Robin Goodfellow would be proud!

gautami tripathy said...

I really like how we get so many ideas out of one photo. Everyone interpreting it differently.

viscous time

signed...bkm said...

Timeless writing Berowne --and " alas, sweet breath, one and all"....bkm

Roger Owen Green said...

sweet-tasting post. or something like that.
very enjoyable read about a play I've seen sone maybe a half dozen times, always differently.

chubskulit said...

Great choice for letter H.
Have a peek on my letter H, see you.

Kay L. Davies said...

Ooh, well done with the Magpie in there, Berowne.
I never would have thought of "head over heels" but it works! Good one.
-- K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Leslie: said...

Always a treat to read your interpretation of Shakespeare! :D

Leslie
ABCW Team

lightverse said...

This was such fun! I was wondering where you were going with this, 'though - and kept saying, "Wait for it, wait for it." Totally worth it! You are such a great read!

Hildred and Charles said...

Would never miss your postings, Berowne - always so entertaining and creative.

Tumblewords: said...

Ha! Amazing garlic insert.

Jingle said...

wow.
what interesting shots.

fun take.

Rinkly Rimes said...

Head over Heels! A clever one. And you got the garlic in there too! As well as giving us a lesson in English literature. (Not one of my favourite plays, though.)

Southwest Arkie said...

I always enjoy your clever takes on Willow's mags. This one is no exception!

helenmac said...

You never fail to hit the high points of the Bard's wit! This is the one play that our readers group indulges in costumes with the most creative being Bottom's new head.
HelenMac, ABC Wednesday Team

Berowne said...

My thanks to Shari Sunday, ds, bkm, Roger O G, Kay L D, Leslie and lightverse for these welcome comments.

Berowne said...

Hildred & Charles: "Would never miss your postings, Berowne"
And I'd never miss your comments -- thanks.

Berowne said...

I'm pleased to offer more thanks to Tumblewords, Jingle, R Rimes, S W Arkie and helenmac.

☆♥Shydub♥☆ said...

Very cute and interesting post

Say Hi to my Horse, my entry for H.

Doctor FTSE said...

Wonderful, to find a reference to garlic in Shakespeare. Google found me one in Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales", also in the "Odyssey" Well told, as usual.

Lena said...

If only it kind of went like this at high school! Entertaining as usual!

Kavita said...

hahaha...this was one sweet comedy alright!!
I loved Shakespeare's potential "lingo"... it nearly KILLED ME!! :-)

Gosh... they should really make a play out of this script!! "Seriously"!!! :)

Trellissimo said...

One always learns something from your interesting posts. Thank you.

Helen said...

Well done .. this is thoroughly enchanting. Love the artwork too.

Stafford Ray said...

'everyone will say, it is a sweet comedy' Yes indeed!

Berowne said...

Whatever digging and/or researching you have to do to come up with an appropriate response to prompts, it's all worth it when you get such comments as these from Shydub, Dr. FTSE, Lena, Kavita, Trellissimo, Helen and Stafford Ray -- thanks.

Linda Jacobs said...

This is delightful!

jaerose said...

Magical mix of words and musing Berowne..Jae

Deborah said...

A joy to read :o)

JTS said...

An enchanting tale well written, with a clever bit tossed in there at the end! :-)

Reflections said...

Delightful read... love the interpretation here. Well done.

oldegg said...

What a delightful post as usual. I noticed the Jassack as opposed the Jackass but didn't get it, so was it a mistake after all?:)

spacedlaw said...

Garlic insertion (or warning) at the last minute! Well done.

Berowne said...

oldegg: "Was it a mistake after all?"
It was no mistake. :-)

Kodjo Deynoo. said...

This is comedy in words

Old Altonian said...

I have read Lamb's 'Tales from Shakespeare', must admit yours is a bit more entertaining; more in keeping with the 21st. Century.

Gloria said...

Thoroughly enjoyed reading this, Berowne. You are quite clever, as well as entertaining, in your responses.

Berowne said...

Gloria: "Thoroughly enjoyed reading this, Berowne."
Thanks, Gloria; you're in Excelsis. :-)

Berowne said...

Linda J, jaerose, Deb, JTS, Reflections, spacedlaw and Old Altonian -- always great to hear from you; thanks.

 
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